Shelby County Biographies Project
 
 

 William Christie Smyser
    A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans,
written & compiled by William E.Connelley,
1918

Submitted by: Tina Hursh,


     WILLIAM CHRISTIE SMYSER, who died at Sterling, Kansas, August 9, 1917, had been for thirty-five years a resident of that section of the state. Few men have assumed and carried out to such a successful conclusion the larger responsibilities of business affairs. One of the outstanding characteristics of big business men is a quiet efficiency of performance that handles a great volume of work with a notable absence of noise andconfusion. This quiet efficiency was a mark of Mr. Smyser's entire career. Underhis direction large affairs were transacted and things got themselves donein theform of concrete results, but in such a way as to attract little notice tothe sourceof the power and energy.

The foundation of his business success was laid during his connection with the broom corn industry of Western Kansas. For a number of years he was one of the most extensive dealers in this crop, buying in carload lots. After he gave this up he concentrated all his time upon the buying and feeding of sheep, and was undoubtedly one of the biggest producers of mutton and wool in the State of Kansas. He amassed a large property in farm land and always lived in close touch with the soil. He was a student of farming from its scientific as well as practical point of view. He knew and understood soils, and seldom made an error in adapting his crops and his business to the variations of soil and climate.

William Christie Smyser was born at Milford, Ohio, September 5, 1839, and at the time of his death his age was seventy-seven years, eleven months, four days. 

He was a son of Abram and Susan Smyser. The early part of his life was spent in his native county and he completed his education by graduating from the Milford
Seminary. Mr. Smyser was descended from one of the oldest German families of noble descent, who flourished among the Silesian knighthood. In the twelfth
century they called and signed themselves "The Schmeissers of Ehrenprrisburg," and this family bore the coat of arms of their knightly kinsfolk, carrying the date
1128 A. D.

Of Mr. Smyser's life in Kansas the Sterling Bulletin had this to say: "Mr. Smyser came to Sterling with his family in 1882 and since that time has made his home
here. He was well known all over the state and was the largest sheep feeder in Kansas. He fed from 15,000 to 20,000 sheep a year. He was a good business man, not only being a success in a business way but also was noted for his honesty and business integrity. He was naturally of a retired, quiet disposition, never
caring to have any public demonstration made concerning his affairs. He was a very generous man, but gave in such a quiet way that but few people really knew of
his generosity. Courteous, pleasant and cheerful he made many friends. He liked young people and kept in close touch with them and their interests. He was
devoted to his family and with his sons he was an intimate companion, and enjoyed their society and company always, even to the exclusion of older friends.
He led a straightforward, upright life. He had been a member of the Congregational church for years. He was a great Bible student and derived much comfort and help from reading the scriptures. Few men were more optimistic in their nature, few men more kind and thoughtful in their homes, and few will be more missed from a home than Mr. Smyser."

He was an active member of Sterling Lodge No. 171, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and some of his brother Mason's acted as pall bearers at his funeral.
Earlier in life he had also been identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias. In politics he was a democrat by principle,
often aided the party, and at the same time was independent in supporting various candidates, an instance of which is that he cast a vote for the republican
governor, Capper. 

In his will Mr. Smyser left his entire estate to his wife as executrix. She had been his constant helpmate and companion for nearly half a century.

It was in Shelby County, Ohio, October 28, 1868, that William C. Smyser and Miss Lavinia J. Brown were united in the ties that endured for nearly fifty
years.

Mrs. Smyser was born at Piqua, Ohio, of an old and prominent family of that state. Her first American ancestor was Thomas Brown, who immigrated from
Wales and settled in Virginia. He took part as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Mrs. Smyser's grandfather, Joseph Brown, a son of Thomas, the Revolutionary
patriot, was born in 1761. He added to the military record of the family by service in the War of 1812. For this service the Government gave him a land grant, and
that grant was placed in Missouri, and the City of Carrollton has since been built on the land. Joseph Brown was a pioneer settler in Southern Ohio, locating in
Clermont County, where he spent his last years and where he died in 1851.

The father of Mrs. Smyser was John Brown, who was born in Clermont County, Ohio, in 1806, when that region was all a wilderness. Right after his
marriage he moved north to Piqua and located in the big woods, where he cleared up a farm. He settled on that farm in 1828 and now, after a lapse of nearly ninety years, the old homestead of 160 acres is owned by his son, John P. He was a very prominent man at Piqua in Miami County, where he helped establish the first bank, but his home and chief interests were in the adjoining County of Shelby, where his success as a farmer made him the wealthiest man of the county at one time. In the pioneer days one of the neighbors of the Brown family was the famous Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon Church, who lived on a farm adjoining the Brown homestead on the south. John Brown became identified with the republican party upon its organization and was a very active churchman of the Christian denomination. He died in Shelby County, Ohio, in 1879, at the age of seventy-one.

John Brown married Mary Fitzwater. She was born in Clermont County, Ohio, June 27, 1809, and died at Piqua December 31, 1889, Of their six children Mrs.
Smyser was the eighth. Maria, the oldest, died at Piqua, wife of James Wise, a farmer, also deceased. Elizabeth, living at Windsor, Illinois, is the widow
of John Smyser, who died at Windsor in 1880, and was a brother of the late William C. Smyser. Mary Ann, the next older sister of Mrs. Smyser, died at Piqua, wife of John W. Widney, a farmer, now deceased. John P. has already been mentioned as the owner of the old homestead. The youngest child is Ward Brown, who owns some of his father's original land holdings in Ohio.

Mrs. Smyser grew up and was educated in the public schools at Piqua, and came to Kansas with her husband in 1882. She has identified herself with the social and public life of Sterling in many ways. She is an active member of the Congregational Church and through her ancestry is a member of the Daughters of
the American Revolution. Her relationship with early colonial families is a most interesting one. Her great-grandmother, Mary Ball, was a first cousin and a
bosom friend of the mother of Gen. George Washington. Thus Mrs. Smyser is entitled to the Ball coat of arms. She has been very active in the Daughters and in 1905,  while regent for twelve years of the Kansas Chapter, the first marker for the Santa Fe Trail was placed in position by the chapter. Later she assisted in
placing and selecting the granite markers for the trail throughout the state. She is treasurer of the Pawnee Rock Association, and Governor Hoch commissioned her to erect the monument at Pawnee Rock and she was largely instrumental in raising the funds for the purchase of that monument. She is still treasurer of the
association. Mrs. Smyser is past worthy matron of Sterling Chapter No. 47, Order of Eastern Star, is president of the Home Culture Club, the oldest woman's club in Sterling; and is a member of the P. E. O. Sisterhood.

Mr. and Mrs. Smyser had three children, two sons and one daughter. The oldest is Dr. Harley Brown Smyser, who was born October 21, 1869. He attended the
high school and studied dentistry, passing the examination before the State Board of Dental Surgery. He now resides at Wichita, where he has an office, and also
other offices in Hutchinson, Pratt and Kinsley. He is married and his two children are Bessie Lucile and Paul Ward. Mary Alberta, the only daughter, born May 1,
1871, is a graduate of Bethany College at Topeka and a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was organizer of Sterling Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, and is ex-regent of Urbana Chapter of Urbana, Ohio, where she occupies a prominent position in social and club life. She married C.
F. Johnson and they live at Urbana, Ohio, where Mr. Johnson is a manufacturer of tin products used by railroads and also of halters and similar wares. The younger son, John Ward, born August 26, 1874, graduated from the Western Dental College of Kansas in 1899, but has never followed that professional
career, giving all his time and attention to the sheep feeding business. His own farm of 320 acres is a mile and a half east of Sterling, and he is also manager of
the large estate of his father, comprising 1,280 acres. The family also rent 160 acres, a tract of land which has been used by them for twenty-five years and
which they have never been able to buy. J. Ward Smyser maintains the sheep feeding business on the same scale as his father conducted it, and every year from
15,000 to 20,000 sheep are pastured and fed on the Smyser ranch. J. Ward Smyser is a democrat, an active supporter of the Congregational Church, and is
affiliated with Sterling Lodge No. 171, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. In 1915, at Sterling, he married Miss May Hughes, who was born at Sterling.
    



Edward E. Kah
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 520
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

EDWARD E. KAH
     one of the representative and old established business men of Sidney, who for twenty-two years has been proprietor of Kah's Jewelry Store, and who, for thirty-four years has been in the jewelry and optical business, was born on his father's farm in Franklin township, Shelby county, O., December 23, 1857, and is a son of George and Dorothy (Zimpher) Kah.
     George Kah was born in Germany and both he and wife came to America prior to marriage, with their parents, settling in Shelby county. After marriage they lived for some time on their farm in Franklin township and then came to Sidney, where George Kah conducted a shoe store, being a practical shoemaker. He died at Sidney, December 10, 1904, where his widow, now aged eighty-two years, still resides.
     Edward E. Kah attended school in this city and then gave his father assistance in the shoe store until he was twenty-one years old, when he felt at liberty to follow his own inclinations in regard to his choice of career. Consequently he went to work for C. W. McKee, who, at that time, conducted a jewelry store in the Wagner House block. He finally bought the business from Mr. McKee but in order, to get a more desirable location, had to buy a book store, which he continued to conduct in conjunction with his other business until 1911, when he dosed out that feature but still continues to handle wall paper and picture moldings. He is considering the matter of erecting a new building and moving into it in the near future, although he already owns a fine block in which Young Brothers' clothing store is located. He is an expert watchmaker and a graduated optician, having completed his course in the latter branch in a well known optical college at Chicago, in 1898.
     Mr. Kah married Miss Carrie A. Bush, a daughter of George L. Bush, of Sidney. They enjoy the comforts of a handsome residence on North Walnut avenue. Mr. Kah is a man of quiet tastes and is identified fraternally with but one organization, the Knights of Pythias.




  Louis Kah, Jr.
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 821
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

LOUIS KAH, JR.
     who is second vice-president of the Shelby County Building and Loan Association, at Sidney, Ohio, and a director of the same and practically its first promoter, belongs to one of the stable old families of the county, of German extraction. He was born on a farm in Dinsmore township, Shelby county, ten miles north of Sidney, Ohio, September 21, 1855, and is a son of George and Dorothy (Zimpfer) Kah.
     George Kah and wife were born in Germany and the latter was only three years old when her parents came to the United States and located sixteen miles east of Columbus, Ohio. When she was eight years old they came to Shelby county and settled on land east of Anna, where her father, Jacob Zimpfer, secured land. Mrs. Kah still survives, but Mr. Kah died at Sidney, to which place they moved in 1864, and there he carried on a shoe business until the close of his life.
     Louis Kah, Jr., attended the public schools of Sidney and afterward assisted his uncle, Louis Kah, Sr., for whom he was named, in conducting a general store at Anna. After returning to Sidney and finding no business opening that was satisfactory, he accepted a position as bookkeeper in a town in Georgia, where he remained for two years when he again returned to his home in Sidney. Here, in 1880, he embarked in the tin and hardware line in which he continued for nine years, in the meanwhile becoming interested in the electric lighting business. His enterprise and public spirit induced him to purchase a site across the river where he installed an electric light and water plant, in 1900, which was of the greatest utility and was known under his name. Mr. Kah subsequently sold the same to the Sidney Electric Light Company, since which time he has been somewhat retired. It was largely through his efforts that the business men of Sidney became interested in the papers to secure subscribers. The company was organized in December, organization of the building and loan company which has developed into so important a business factor here, Mr. Kah personally presenting the first 1895, and began business in the Metcalf building, removing in 1901 to a fine modern structure of their own.
     In 1876 Mr. Kah was married to Miss Alfaretta E. Anderson, who is a daughter of William H. Anderson, of Sidney, and they have six children, namely: Harland Edward, who is connected in a business way with the Sidney Building and Loan Association: Ralph C., who is assistant secretary of the above organization; Julia; Carrie, who is the wife of R. M. Moore, lives in Tennessee; William H., who is a watchmaker by trade: and D. C., whose business interests are connected with wall paper at Sidney. Mr. Kah is a leading member of the Sidney Commercial Club.


Joseph Kaiser
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 812
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JOSEPH KAISER
     one of the representative men of Cynthian township; Shelby county, O., resides two and a half miles south and one-half mile west of Fort Loramie, where he owns 136 acres of well improved, valuable land. He was born in Auglaize county, O., northwest of Minster, December 26, 1858, and is a son of Theodore and Elizabeth (Stegemann) Kaiser.
     Theodore arid Elizabeth Kaiser, parents of Joseph Kaiser, were natives of Germany, he having been born in Hersbruck, Prussia, March 25, 1805, and Mrs. Kaiser at Handorf, Westphalen, March 19, 1822. Several years after his father died, Theodore Kaiser came to the United States with his mother and his brother, and the latter's family. They arrived in Glandorf, Putnam county, O., August 14, 1836, where they stayed more than a year, then moved to Minster, Auglaize county, O. Theodore Kaiser then helped to dig the Miami and Erie canal. Elizabeth Kaiser came to the United States with her parents, her grandmother, three sisters and one brother, in 1836. They passed through Cincinnati, O., on their way to Minster, Auglaize county, and Elizabeth, with her next-oldest sister remained in Cincinnati to work, as their parents were not financially able to take their whole family to Minster. They remained there a few years, then also moved to Minster where they gave their parents help on their rented farm. Theodore Kaiser was married at Minster to Elizabeth Stegemann, in 1840, and they made their home on a farm two and one-half miles northwest from Minster, O., now in possession of their son, John Kaiser. At the time of their marriage, they had but a part of the farm as it now is, later adding to it until it consisted of 100 acres. They became parents of the following children: Henry; William; Bernard; Mary; Anna; Mary; John; Joseph; Frank; and Anton. Of these children: William and the two named Mary died in infancy and were buried in the St. Augustinus Catholic graveyard at Minster; and Henry, who died on his farm about one and one-half miles northwest of Chickasaw, Mercer county, O., January 29, 1892, aged forty-nine years, six months and twenty-seven days and was buried in St. Sebastian's graveyard. Theodore Kaiser, father of the subject of this sketch, died on his farm. August 30, 1880, aged seventy-five years, four months and five days. His widow remained on the home farm a few years, then went to the home of her son, Frank Kaiser, about one and a half miles southeast from Sharpsburg, Darke county, O., where she died on July 12, 1908, aged eighty-six years, three months and twenty-three days. Theodore Kaiser and his wife were laid to rest in St. Augustinus Catholic graveyard at Minster. They were good, wholesouled, kind-hearted people, and were devout members of the Catholic church at Minster. The mother of Theodore Kaiser, both parents of Elizabeth Kaiser and her grandmother also died in Minster, and were buried in St. Augustinus Catholic graveyard at that place.
     Joseph Kaiser attended school in boyhood at Minster, O., and afterward gave his father help on the farm. After the father's death, the mother, by will, gave the farm to her son Joseph, it being the farm he now owns in Cynthian township, his father having purchased the same before his death. It was partly improved at that time and its present owner has remodeled the farmhouse and repaired all the other farm buildings, making the place comfortable and attractive. All of his land is under cultivation except twenty-eight acres yet in timber and, with all of it well watered by the canal and Loramie creek, he finds it well adapted to both crop and stock-raising.
     Joseph Kaiser was united in marriage with Miss Mary Housfeld, February, 16, 1887, in St. Peter and St. Paul's Catholic church at Newport, Shelby county, O., by Rev. Father Nicolous Poirey. Mary Housfeld was born July 7, 1865, near Minster, Auglaize county, O., and is a daughter of Joseph and Caroline Housfeld. Her parents were both natives of Auglaize county, O., he having been born in 1837 and his wife on January 28, 1846. He died on the farm on which he was born, the date of his death being March 11, 1881, when aged forty-four years, and he was buried in St. Augustinus Catholic graveyard. He was always a devout member of the Catholic church at Minster. Mr. and Mrs. Housfeld had the following children: John, Mary, Caroline, Joseph. Henry, Elizabeth, Bernard, Clemens and Rosa. Of these children, all survive except: Clemens, who died in infancy; John, who died in Cincinnati on September 4, 1900, aged thirty-six years, seven months and ten-days; and Henry, who died at St. Mary's, O., on November 25, 1912; aged forty-one years, eleven months and twenty-five days. The last named and Clemens were buried in St. Augustinus Catholic graveyard, and John was buried in a Catholic cemetery at Cincinnati, O.
     Joseph and Mary Kaiser became parents of the following children: Cecelia, Elizabeth, Louis, Mary, Julia, Paulina, August, Amelia, Rosa and Emma. All were born on the home farm and all are living but August, who died June 11, 1901, aged two years, five months and twenty-three days; and Amelia, who died December 30, 1900, aged fourteen days. They were both buried in St. Michael's Catholic graveyard at Fort Loramie. Mr. Kaiser and family belong to St. Michael's Catholic church at Ft. Loramie. Mr. Kaiser is a democrat.


Jonas Kauffman
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 517
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JONAS KAUFFMAN
     who is now pleasantly situated at Sidney, O.,  occupying his comfortable residence at No. 605 South Ohio avenue, is a retired  farmer and still retains the ownership of his valuable farm of seventy-seven  acres lying in Clinton township, not far from the location of the Shelby County Infirmary. He was born in Mifflin county, Pa., April 4, 1846, and is a son of Christian and Catherine Kauffman, both of whom died in Pennsylvania.
     Jonas Kauffman had district school advantages in boyhood and remained on the home farm until 1865, starting out for himself at the age of twenty-one years. For four years afterward he worked on the farms of agriculturists in Juniata county, Pa., and from there went to Wayne county, O. He worked there for a short time as a farm hand and then enlisted for a period of six months is a government employe, which he passed at Little Rock, Ark., and from there came to Shelby county. For several years afterward Mr. Kauffman worked at different things, during the summers mainly on farms and in the winter time finding teaming and other kinds of labor ready at hand for any one willing to exercise self denial and muscle. After marriage he and wife went to housekeeping at Sidney for a time, while he was employed in a brick yard, but Mr. Kauffman preferred farm life and they soon went into the country and there he acquired tracts of valuable land. For twenty-five years he and wife lived on their farm of 156 acres, situated in Cynthian township, west of Sidney, after which Mr. Kauffman traded that farm for his present one of seventy-seven acres, receiving also $4,500 additional in cash. In 1901 Mr. and Mrs. Kauffman came to their present home at Sidney, where they are well known and highly respected people.
     In the spring of 1866 Mr. Kauffman was married to Miss Elizabeth King, who was born in Berks county, Pa., a daughter of Michael King. She was six years old when her parents settled in Clinton township, Shelby county, where they had a farm of 142 acres, which Mr. Kauffman subsequently owned and then sold to William Kingseed. Mr. and Mrs. Kauffman have two children : Adam Francis, who is a farmer in Miami county, O.; and Nora, who
lives with her parents. The family belongs to the Christian church.


John H. Kemp
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 496
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JOHN H. KEMP
     one of-the substantial farmers of Perry township, who resides on his forty-acre tract and owns a second farm containing ninety-five acres, both in Perry township, was born in Salem township, Shelby county, January 29, 1855. He is a son of Henry and Eliza J. (Gray) Kemp.
     After his school days, which were spent in the district schools of Salem township, John H. Kemp started out to take care of himself. Possessing industry and good Judgment, he easily found employment as a farm hand and as he prudently saved his money he was soon enabled to buy land, his first investment being the forty acres on which he resides, this purchase being made in 1894. Here he has placed many improvements, including a commodious and comfortable residence and a substantial barn and other farm buildings. His second farm he purchased at a sheriff's sale, in 1908. Mr. Kemp no longer is an active fanner, having practically retired. The larger number of his brothers and sisters live in this county, he being the second born of his parents' children. The others were: Phoebe Jane, who married twice, first.  Frank Armstrong, and second, Jonathan Henman; Mary, who is deceased, was the wife of John Stiles; Louvina, who married (first) William Winsor, (second) William Beerline; and George C, Emmanuel E. and Samuel N.
     On August 9, 1881, Mr. Kemp was married to Miss Anna DeWeese, a daughter of J. D. and Lydia (Kiser) DeWeese, who were early settlers in Shelby county. To Mr. and Mrs. DeWeese the following children were born: D. K.; Benjamin and Thomas, both of whom are deceased; Anna; Samantha, who is deceased, was the wife of Mack Van Demark; Therza, who is the wife of A. N. Stephenson; Jethro M.; Cora, who is the wife of Isaac Green; and James. Mr. and Mrs. Kemp have an adopted son, Albert W., who was born September 8, 1907, to whom every educational advantage will be given and whose future is well assured if he develops, as now promises, into a youth of fine character and of more than ordinary intellect. Mr. and Mrs. Kemp attend the Baptist church at Pemberton, 0. Politically Mr. Kemp is a republican and for fourteen years he served as a trustee of Perry township. For six years he filled the responsible position of superintendent of the Children's Home in Shelby county and during this time his wife was the matron, their administration being marked by efficiency. Mr. Kemp belongs to the Knights of Pythias and attends the lodge at De Graff, O.


O.L. Kerr
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 644
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

O. L. KERR
     who has held the office of postmaster at Houston, O., since Jane, 1902, and is also ticket agent of the Big Four railroad at that place, was born in Northwood. Logan county, O., July 20, 1868, a son of D. P. and Charlotte E. (Carter) Kerr. Both his parents were natives of Logan county, the mothers family residing at Huntsville, O., and in that county they were married. Mrs. D. P. Kerr was a daughter of K. G. and Nancy A. (Cooper) Carter; her father, K. G. Carter, who came from Virginia, died at Cherokee, Logan county, this state.. Her mother, Nancy A. (Cooper) Carter, the maternal grandmother of O. L. Kerr, died at Huntsville, Logan county.
     Mr. Kerr's parents resided for a short time at Bellefontaine, in Logan county, from which place they removed to Northwood in the same county, and then to Harper, also in that county, where D. P. Kerr was engaged for some time in mercantile business. Afterwards he carried on the same business at Big Springs, Logan county, O., and was postmaster there for a number of years. He next moved to Alvada, O., and after a short stay came back to Logan county, settling at Wharton, where he conducted, a store. This he subsequently sold and taking up his residence again in Bellefontaine, spent the rest of his days in that place, where he died August 3, 1910, at the age of seventy-three years and one month. He was buried in the old Harrod cemetery, near Huntsville, O. He was married to Charlotte E. Carter September 15, 1864. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church, and at one time he studied for the ministry but was obliged to relinquish his studies on account of poor health. He was a republican in politics and while a resident of Bellefontaine, served as assessor of his ward. He and his wife were the parents of two children: Minnie, who died in infancy, and O. L., the subject of this sketch.
     O. L. Kerr in his boyhood attended school at Harper and Big Springs, O., and then attended the Agosta Normal School at Agosta, Marion county, O. He then began business life as clerk in his father's store. He later began the study of telegraphy in the employ of the old "Bee line" and a year later was taken on as extra agent. In April, 1890, he was made station agent at Houston for the Big Four, formerly the old "Bee Line," which position he has since held. having performed his duties in a manner satisfactory to the company. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Piqua Lodge, No. 8, of the O. R. T. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, in which he holds the office of deacon and clerk. In politics he is a republican, as was his father.
     O. L. Kerr was married August 22, 1893, to Mary P. Ginn, who was born west of Fort Loramie, O., March 9, 1875, a daughter of John and Ella A. (Wilson) Ginn, of McLean township, who are now residents of Houston, this county. Mr. and Mrs. Kerr have had children as follows: Paul Ginn, born August 9, 1895, who died July 24, 1896, and is buried in Houston cemetery; Dean Burwell, born September 18, 1898, who is now a pupil in the eighth grade of the Houston school; Dale Wilson, born August 2, 1902, who is in the fifth grade of the same school; and Vesta Agnes, born October 27, 1905, who is in the second grade, Houston special school district. Mr. and Mrs. Kerr have resided in Houston since their marriage, where they have many friends. Mrs. Kerr is a member of the Presbyterian church, and an active member of the W. C. T. U., being president of the local branch.


Julius W.C. Kettler
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 858
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JULIUS W. C. KETTLER
     a well known citizen and retired farmer, residing in Kettlersville, Van Buren township, was born in New Bremen, Auglaize county, O., in 1852, a son of William and Minnie (Donnerberg) Kettler. His parents were natives of Germany who came to America in the forties of the 19th century. Their family consisted of three children: Sophia, Matilda, and Julius W. C.   Sophia, who became the wife of August Mauer, resides in Kettlersville, this county; Matilda married William Tangeman and resides in the state of Iowa.
     The subject of this sketch was educated in the schools of New Bremen, O., and after his school days were over obtained a position as clerk in a hardware store, subsequently working for a while in a dry goods store. He then took a trip to Germany, and after his return was associated with his father in the store for three years. He then engaged in agriculture and was so occupied for a period of 34 years, from 1875 to 1909, at the end of which time, having amassed a fair competence, he retired and took up his residence in the village of Kettlersville. He owns a good farm of 150 acres and some favorably situated town property besides 22 lots within the corporation.
     Mr. Kettler and wife Maria have been the parents of six children, namely: Clara, Mahala, Amelia, Laura, Emma and Herbert. Clara, who married William Mauer, resides in Kettlersville.  She is the mother of twin sons, Vernon and Ernest. Mahala married W. Breidweiser, and they reside in New Bremen. She has two children, Glenna, who is attending high school, and Oran, at home. Amelia is the wife of Aerny Tangeman and resides on her father's farm. She has two children, Marie and Helen. Laura married William Webber and lives in Lima, O. Emma is the wife of G. R. Brandt and lives in Dayton. She has one child, Carl. Herbert is a student at Ohio State University, Columbus.
     Mr. Kettler is a Democrat in politics and served as township clerk for a period of fourteen years. He was also village clerk for four years. A member of the Lutheran church, he has acted as a trustee, secretary, and elder for years. He is a man highly respected throughout this part of the township.


David R. Key
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 750
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

DAVID R. KEY
     whose fine farm of 122 acres lies in Perry township and adjoins the old homestead on which, he was born in October, 1858, is one of the well-known men of this section and a representative of one of the old and sturdy families of Shelby county. He is a son of John and Anna (Rhinehart) Key and a grandson of John Key. Grandfather Key was born in Virginia in 1781 and about 1800 came to Ohio, settling in Montgomery county, where he died fifteen years later. He left a widow and five children, a son, John, being born six months after his death.
     John Key, father of David R. Key, was bom in Montgomery county, O., in 1816 and remained in Montgomery county with his mother until 1836 and then came to Shelby county, but returned to Montgomery county one year later and lived there until 1840, when he again came to Shelby county and rented land for several years, saving his money, and then buying more land. He had but fifty dollars when he came here the first time, and this money he invested in land, entering forty acres in Jackson township and later, through industry, thrift and good judgment, securing the means to enter 160 acres in Indiana. That land he subsequently traded for eighty acres in Shelby county and to that tract he later added until his farm contained 240 acres. He improved all that land together with 300 acres in Perry township, 140 acres
in Champaign county, and also acquired realty at Sidney and Millerstown. He at one time owned 983 acres in tills and Champaign county. His first marriage was in 1841, to Lillie Lucas, who, at death, left two sons: John H. and Norman. In 1847 he married Anna Rhinehart for his second wife and seven children were born to them: Amanda, Rachel, Elizabeth, Jane, David R. Sherman and Orlando B.
     David R. Key attended the district schools through boyhood and then assisted his father and thus gained a very practical knowledge of farming. He has always been engaged in agricultural pursuits and for some years in the past dealt in stock but now confines himself to a general farming line and the raising of stock for home use only.
     In 1883 Mr. Key was married to Miss Maggie M. Heffner, a daughter of William and Sarah (Sargent) Heffner. The father of Mrs. Key was a soldier in the Civil war and there lost his life, and her mother died while she was a child. The other members of her parents' family were: Mary, wife of William McLean; Jasel, deceased; David L.; George and William, Mrs. Key being the youngest of the family. To Mr. and Mrs. Key four children have been born: Grace, who is the wife of L. E. Ranck; Mary Robinson; and Maurice H., who are twins; and Laura Murriel. The family attends the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Key is a republican in politics but has never been willing to accept public office.


Orlando Burton Key
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 706
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

ORLANDO BURTON KEY
     who is one of the well known and substantial men of Perry township, a stockholder in the Fanners Telephone Company and the owner of 120 acres of well developed land, was born on this farm, the old Key homestead, in Shelby county, O., May 25, 1870, and is a son of John and Anna (Rinehart) Key.
     John Key, father of Orlando B. Key, was a son of John Key, who was born in Virginia in 1781 and came to Montgomery county, O., in 1800, where he died in 1815, leaving his wife with four children, although the youngest, John, was not bom until 1816, six months after the father's death. His mother remained in Montgomery county until 1836, when she came with him to Shelby county and they lived about one year in Jackson township and then went back to Montgomery county, where he lived until 1840, after which he lived continuously in Shelby county. In 1841 occurred his first marriage, to Newlillie Lucas, who died in July, 1846, leaving two children, Norman and John H. In 1847 John Key married Anna Rinehart and seven children were bom to them: Amanda, wife of William DeWeese; Rachel, wife of Dr. D. N. Whitmire; Margaret Elizabeth, wife of John Maxwell; Martha Jane, wife of Frank Marrs; David R.: Thomas Levi, who died aged two years; Abraham Sherman; and Orlando B.
     When John Key came to Shelby county he had fifty dollars as his sole capital and with this sum he entered forty acres of land in Jackson township, then went to work by the day and month and kept on until he had saved one hundred dollars, with which he entered eighty acres of land in Indiana. He kept on working and saving, and after accumulating another one hundred dollars entered another tract of land in Indiana and afterward traded his Indiana land for eighty acres in the woods of Shelby county. The latter place he then cleared and improved and later added two other eighty-acre tracts, making his home place consist of 240 acres. Here he erected a sound brick dwelling house and kept on improving his land in every way, subsequently, through his industry and good judgment acquiring other farm land and valued real estate in Sidney and Millerstown.
     Orlando B. Key attended the public schools in Perry township and afterward took a business course in a commercial college at Dayton, O., following which he spent three years in the western states. Finding no section of the country more satisfactory than his own. Mr. Key then returned to Shelby county and has ever since been engaged in farming and stock raising in Perry township. He is an independent voter in politics and has never accepted any public office except once when he was appointed a member of the local school board.
     In 1895 Mr. Key was married to Miss Bessie Stockstill, a daughter of John P. and Mary (Miller) Stockstill. In early manhood the father of Mrs. Key followed the trades of tinner and carpenter but later became a fanner in Shelby county. He was twice married, first to Mary Miller and second to Jennie Varner. To the first union two children were born: Carrie, who died young, and Bessie, who became the wife of Mr. Key, Two children were born to the second marriage: Newton and Varner. Three children have
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Key: Fred Miller, John Otis and Max Allan. Mr. and Mrs. Key attend the United Brethren church at Pascoe, O.  He is identified fraternally with the Masonic lodge at Port Jefferson and also the Odd Fellows and is a member of the Encampment at Sidney, O.


George Kies
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 676
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

GEORGE KIES
     who successfully carries on general farming and stock raising in Dinsmore township, Shelby county, O., owns an excellent farm of 160 acres, situated two and
one-half miles southeast of Botkins, was born in this township and is a son of Michael and Frederica (Seamans) Kies.
     The parents of Mr. Kies were bom in Germany and in their native land and afterward, in the United States, were highly respected people. They were the parents of the following children: Adam, Henry, Mary, Anna, John, Sophia, George and Catherine. Adam married Ann Shuler, and they live at Botkins, O. Henry married Louisa Groves and they live three miles from Botkins. Mary married Jacob Elsass of Auglaize county, O.  Anna married David Rheinhart and they live also in Auglaize county. John, who died at the age of fifty-seven years, married Caroline Groves. Sophia is deceased. Catherine is the widow of Louis Zeble and lives at Wapakoneta, O.
     George Kies attended the public schools in Dinsmore township and ever since, with the exception of twelve years, has followed farming. He owns a beautiful property which is kept in the best of condition, his buildings being attractive and substantial and all his industries are carried on according to the latest methods. In visiting a model farm like Mr. Kies it is easy to see why an Ohio agriculturist may be classed with the most independent and contented of men. Productive fields, bountiful orchards, healthy cattle and stock, abundance in every direction, with order and comfort reigning in the home, this presents a pleasant picture.
     Mr. Kies was married first to Miss Caroline Wilt, and they had two children, Emma Elizabeth and Martha M. The latter died in infancy. Emma Elizabeth married George Elsass and they live in Auglaize county and have three children: Edna, Amelia and Leona. Mr. Kies' second marriage was to Miss Maggie Meyers, a daughter of Casper and Margaret Meyers. Mrs. Kies had two brothers. Henry and John, the former of whom is deceased and the latter lives at Portland, Ind. Mr. Kies and wife belong to the Lutheran church, in which he has been a trustee for a number of years and of which he is a liberal supporter.


John Charles Fremont Kiggins
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 479
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JOHN CHARLES FREMONT KIGGINS
     who is a retired farmer, since 1905 has been a resident of Sidney, O., where he is well known and highly respected and was bom in Shelby county,O.September 3, 1855, on a farm of forty acres, the old home place, situated in Orange township, which he disposed of at the time of retirement from active life. He is a son of John Robert and Same Ann (McCloskey) Kiggins. John Robert Kiggins was born in Miami county, O., and was a son of Robert Kiggins, who was a native of Ireland. After marriage John Robert Kiggins came to Orange township and settled on the above mentioned farm and continued to reside there until his death in 1898.
     John C. F. Kiggins was reared on the home farm and spent forty-nine years there, all his life practically until 1905, with the exception of five years following his marriage, when he rented land. When he contracted to purchase the homestead he had no capital, but afterward he developed a large amount, of business sagacity which not only enabled him to honestly clear off this indebtedness but also to make other wise investments. At one time he owned a farm of seventy-two acres, situated in Logan county, which property he sold one year later to great advantage. Another farm of eighty acres, located in Jackson township, near Jackson Center, he owned for three years and then sold at a much higher price than he had paid, the difference being between $85 and $117 per acre. Mr. Kiggins then went on a prospecting tour to Houston, Tex., and in that vicinity bought 320 acres, paying $38 per acre, which he held for an advance in price, and recently sold one-half of the tract for $45 per acre, still retaining the rest of the land. Still later he purchased twenty acres, for a town site, paying $250 an acre, and this valuable property he still holds. When he decided to retire and move to Sidney, he bought his fine residence on South Miami avenue and began to consider propositions for the sale of his homestead, on which he had made excellent improvements. When he finally disposed of the forty acres he received what was regarded as a record price, $150 an acre. That the land is worth that and still more has been evidenced by a still later change of owners, ,the last purchaser paying $175 per acre, this giving a pretty fair idea of the general value of Shelby county farm land when it has been properly developed.
     In the fall of 1884, Mr. Kiggins was married to Miss Laura Ella Cozier, who was bom at Piqua, O., a daughter of Theodore Cozier. Mr. Cozier and family lived at Piqua until Mrs. Kiggins was sixteen years of-age, when he traded his city property for a farm in Green township, Shelby county. Mr. and Mrs. Kiggins are members of the First Baptist church at Sidney, in which he is a deacon. He has been identified with the order of Odd Fellows for many years.



Wilber E. Kilborn
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 425
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

WILBER E. KILBORN
     one of the representative and substantial business men of Sidney, O., treasurer and general manager of the American Steel Scraper Company, an important enterprise of this city, was born near Benson, Vt., a son of Edson S. and Martha J. (Wright) Kilborn.
     The parents of Mr. Kilborn came to Shelby county when the latter was eight years old, and later moved to a farm west of Lincoln, Neb. The father engaged in farming and there both parents died and three children survive: Wilber E.; Mrs. Lydia Funk, residing at Milford, Neb.; and Henry S., a farmer in Hamilton county, Neb.
     Wilber E. Kilborn attended the public schools at Sidney, and afterward, for several years, taught school. In 1875 he became cashier of the Citizens Bank and continued until 1881, when he left in order to become manager of the American Steel Scraper Company, of Sidney, and ever since has remained interested in the same business way. a reliable, honorable, conservative factor in the city's life.
     Mr. Kilborn married Miss Anna Hendershott, a daughter of George W. Hendershott, an old resident of Sidney, and they have two surviving children: Helen M., who is the wife of Joseph Hagan, of Toledo; O.; and Ruth, who is a student at Smith College, Northampton, Mass. Mr. Kilborn and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal, church. In his political views he is a republican, and he is an active member of the Commercial Club. In 1912 he erected his handsome residence on North Ohio avenue.


Joseph Oscar King
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 460
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JOSEPH OSCAR KING
     one of the busy and successful general farmers of Clinton township, Shelby county, O., who operates his mother's farm of ninety-four acres, was born in this township, January 4, 1875, and is a son of David M. and Leah (Kauffman) King.
     David M. King was born in Mifflin county, Pa., and came to Ohio when a young man. Here he followed farming all his life dying September 21, 1911, and was a well known and highly respected man, a leading member of the Brethren church. He married Leah Kauffman, who was born also in Mifflin county, Pa., and still resides on her farm in Clinton township. To David M. King and wife the following children were born: Alice K., who is the widow of Nicholas Kauffman; Rebecca, who is the wife of George Davis: Sadie, who is the wife of Walter Parcher; Joseph Oscar; Ida, who is the wife of Harry Tennery: and Amanda, who is the wife of Charles Miltenberger.
     Joseph Oscar King obtained a common school education and since putting aside his books has devoted himself exclusively to farming and stock raising. The home farm is a valuable property and under his excellent management is very productive. He takes a good citizen's interest in public matters, votes, the republican ticket and at present is a school director.
     In 1898 Mr. King was married to Miss Dora Theuer, a daughter of Martin and Anna Theurer. Mrs. Theurer was previously married but her three children, Henry, Charles and Dora, were born to her second union. Mr. and Mrs. King have two children: Helen and Melvin. The family, including the beloved mother, belong to the Brethren church.


Prof. Webster King
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 652
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

PROF. WEBSTER C. KING
     superintendent of schools of Botkins, O., is one of the younger educators of the state and through scholarship and executive ability of a high order, has reached a very prominent position as a teacher. He was born on a farm in Montgomery county, O., June 15, 1884, and is a son of Adam F. and Rose E. (Goode) King.
     In 1888 the parents of Mr. King moved to Shelby county, locating for a short time at Sidney, and then moved to the old Dr. Silver farm in Clinton township, where they resided for a number of years. Subsequently they lived on a farm in Orange township and then moved to Port Jefferson.
     Webster C. King attended the public schools, rural and village, and afterward taught school for seven years, first in Salem township and then in Logan county, and after satisfying himself that a career as an educator would be a congenial one, he entered the Ohio Northern University and there thoroughly prepared himself. Since completing his course there he has taught in different high schools and prior to coming to Botkins in 1910 he taught for three years at Lake View, in Logan county. Under his superintendence the schools of Botkins have made marked advances and he not only has won the confidence of the pupils but the respect and cooperation of his teachers and the public.
     In 1907 Mr. King was married to Miss Cora Nettleship of Port Jefferson, a daughter of A. L. Nettleship, and they have one child, Maurice. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is identified with the Odd Fellows and is more or less interested in various educational organizations in different parts of Ohio


Christian Kirsch
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 457
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

CHRISTIAN KIRSCH
     postmaster at Fort Loramie, O., is a representative citizen of this town, of which he has been a resident for forty-two consecutive years. He was born at Troy, in Concord township, Miami county, O., May 1, 1848, and is a son of John and Christina Kirsch.
     John Kirsch was bom in Hessen, Germany, while his wife was a native of Hanover. About 1855 they moved from Miami county, O., where they had first settled after coming from Germany, and afterward lived in McLean township until their death, when aged respectively seventy and seventy-six years. They were faithful members of St. Michael's Catholic church and were buried in the cemetery adjoining the same. They were well known and highly respected people.
     During boyhood Christian Kirsch attended school when his father could spare him and then learned the carpenter trade, beginning work in 1867 and continuing busy at his trade for forty-two years, coming to Fort Loramie in 1876, where he served as the first town marshal. He has been active in democratic politics and for sixteen years served uninterruptedly as a trustee of McLean township and many times has served usefully and discreetly as a member of the town council. It is through the efforts of such men as Mr. Kirsch that communities prosper for they take an interest in the progress of the town and are the agitators who bring about many useful improvements.
For twenty-nine years Mr. Kirsch has been a member of the volunteer fire company and one of its early organizers. As postmaster Mr. Kirsch has served acceptably since his appointment September 6, 1967, this being a fourth class office, with one rural delivery route.
     Mr. Kirsch was married to Miss Rachel Meyers, who was born at Fort Loramie, O., and is a daughter of Lucas and Otilda Meyers, both of whom are deceased. Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kirsch, four of whom died in infancy. The survivors are: Bernard, who resides at Hamilton, O.; Albert, who resides at Dayton, O.; Adaline, who lives at Minster, in Auglaize county, O.; Anna, who is her father's capable assistant in the post office, at Fort Loramie; Christian, who is a resident of Troy, O.; and Carl, who lives at Hamilton, O.  Mr. Kirsch and family are members of St. Michael's Catholic church.



Elmer D. Kiser
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 794
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

ELMER D. KISER
     who is serving Shelby county most efficiently in the office of county treasurer, is one of the representative citizens of Sidney. He was born on the home farm in Miami county,O., not far from Fletcher, May 8, 1868, and is a son of B. L. and Mary Ann Kiser.
     For many years B. L. Kiser was a farmer in Miami county and his death occurred Just prior to his son's removal to Sidney, his decease being induced to some degree from the ravages of disease contracted while he was loyally serving as a soldier during the Civil war. He enlisted in 1861 in Company E, Seventy-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served out his first enlistment, then reenlisted and continued until the close of the war, in the meanwhile taking part in all the important battles in the western army. His family consisted of three sons and one daughter: Elmer D.; F. D., who is a practicing physician at Casstown, O.; I. C., for .a number of years a physician at Fletcher, in November, 1912, was elected to the Ohio State Senate; and Minnie, who is a resident of Piqua.
     Elmer D. Kiser had only common school advantages in his youth. For some years his father was in an invalided condition, and, as he was the eldest son, many responsibilities early fell on his shoulders. Later on the other two younger brothers were sent to college and both became physicians. Elmer D. Kiser, however, did not profit in this way. His inclinations were directed by a very practical mind and after coming to Sidney, in 1895, he sought a business opening and after working in one of the manufacturing plants for a short time, opened a butcher shop and continued a dealer in meats until his election to his present responsible office, in the fall of 1910, to which, in November, 1912, he was reelected by the largest vote received by any candidate in Shelby county. Mr. Kiser is a prominent factor in the democratic party in this section of the state. He has long been recognized as an upright citizen and public approval has been given of his management of the county finances. To the management of public matters he has applied the sound business principles that he has found secures the best results in his own affairs.
     Mr. Kiser was married in 1888, to Miss Lulu D. Bird, a daughter of S. R. and Celina J. Bird. Mrs. Kiser was born and reared on a farm in Green township, Shelby county, but her parents moved to Sidney in 1894 and here her father died in the following year. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kiser: Dale, who died at the age of sixteen years; John B., who continues his father's meat market at Sidney; and Hilda L., who lives at home. Mr. Kiser is well known and valued in fraternal circles, having membership with the Masons, the Odd Fellows, lower branch and Encampment, the Knights of Pythias and the Red Men.


John M. Klase
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 835
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JOHN M. KLASE
     one of the well-known and busy men of Loramie township, Shelby county, O., who not only carries on farming but also is in the general contracting line, was born in Darke county, O., May 23, 1864, and was reared and educated there.
     John M. Klase continued to live in his native county until he was twenty-six years old, when he married and came to Shelby county and settled on his present finely improved farm of eighty acres and with the exception of one year passed at Versailles, O., when he conducted a butcher shop, he has resided here. This land is particularly well adapted to raising stock and Mr. Klase pays considerable attention to that profitable industry.  He is a general contractor in brick and cement work and in this line does a very considerable amount of business annually. He takes only a good citizen's interest in politics, keeping thoroughly posted but not desiring office for himself, and always votes the democratic ticket. His farm is easily reached on account of its favorable location, lying three miles southwest of Houston.
     Mr. Klase married Miss Lizzie A. Johnston, who was born and reared in Loramie township, and they have four children: James, Joseph, Leonard and Mary. Mr. Klase belongs to the Odd Fellow's lodge at Greenville and to the encampment at Sidney, O.


William Klipstine
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 446
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

WILLIAM KLIPSTINE
     a representative business man of Sidney, O., a dealer in lumber, coal and building materials, with office and yards on South Walnut street, has been a resident of this city for more than ten years, but his birth took place in Darke county, O., March 13, 1867, and he is a son of William and Louisa Klipstine, both of whom were born in Germany.
     The Klipstine family was founded in America by William Klipstine, the grandfather, who came to Ohio and purchased a farm in Darke county when his son William was a child. The maternal grandfather, William Haack, also came from Germany and purchased land in Darke county, and on the above farms the parents of William Klipstine, of Sidney, were reared, together attended the district schools and subsequently married.  They reared a family of three sons and one daughter and both are now deceased, the father passing away in 1894, when aged sixty-seven years. The mother survived until the fall of 1909, her age being seventy-eight years. Their children were: Louis, who is connected with the Peoples Bank at Versailles, O.; Caroline, who is the wife of George H. Worch of Versailles ; William; and Amos, who is a farmer residing on the old homestead near Versailles.
     William Klipstine attended the public schools in the vicinity of his father's farm and later the Versailles high school, and remained engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1889, when he went to Quincy, Logan county, O., where he engaged in the lumber business until 1901, when he came to Sidney as manager of the lumber business of his brother-in-law, George H. Worch, which business he subsequently purchased.  Mr. Klipstine operates a planing mill and deals in all kinds and grades of merchantable lumber and builders supplies, including hardware, paints and wire fencing, and has a commodious and expensive plant, in 1909 erecting his mill, office and storage room. Constant employment is afforded for from ten to twelve men and the business may be included with the very prosperous ones of the city.
     In 1889 Mr. Klipstine was married to Miss Mary Grove, a daughter of Hiram Grove, of Perry county, O., and they have a happy family of six children, evenly divided, as follows: Roy, Charles, Ruth, Caroline, William and Mary. The eldest daughter possesses great artistic talent and it is being cultivated at Roanoke College, Roanoke, Va. Mr. Klipstine and family belong to St. John's Evangelical Lutheran church, at Sidney. Fraternally he is identified with the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is a democrat and has served two terms as a member of the city council, during which period his sound business judgment frequently assisted in the solving of civic problems of importance.


Herman Kloeker
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 637
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

HERMAN KLOEKER
     whose well-improved farm of 120 acres lies in section 7, McLean township, one-half mile south of Fort Loramie, is one of the well-known and highly respected residents of this section. He was born May 1, 1850, at Covington, Ky., and is a son of Herman Henry and Anna Mary Gertrude (Krutzman) Kloeker.
     The parents of Mr. Kloeker were natives of Germany and in 1848 set sail for America. They had a family of seven children. Two of these died at sea and later two more died at Covington, where the family lived for a time. Henry Kloeker died two years ago. Two sons still live: Herman and Ferdinand. Herman Henry Kloeker settled on a farm of fifty acres in Jackson, township, Auglaize county, when he came first to Ohio, purchasing the same and living on it for twelve years, in 1863 moving to McLean township, Shelby county. At that time the present homestead was almost all timberland and it required much hard labor to place it under cultivation and reap profitably for the effort expended. He served creditably as a Union soldier during the Civil war. He lived to the age of sixty-two years and his widow to the age of sixty-nine years. They were laid to rest in St. Michael's church cemetery, both having been devoted members of that church. While living in Auglaize county he served as school director but never accepted any office in Shelby county.
    Herman Kloeker obtained his education in the Egypt schools in Auglaize county and then helped his father, and when the latter died, took charge of the farm which is now his property. He is considered a first-class farmer and has everything very comfortable about him, his many improvements including the erection of the buildings now standing. He has always been a democratic voter and for six years was township trustee.
    Mr. Kloeker married Miss Mary Elizabeth Rottinghaus, who was born in McLean township, Shelby county, and is a daughter of J. B. and Mary Elizabeth (Unterbrink) Rottinghaus, the father being deceased and the mother living, being aged ninety-one years. Mr. and Mrs. Kloeker's children have all been bom on this farm, namely: Annie, who is the wife of Anton P. Raterman of McLean township; Elizabeth, who is the wife of Frank Lindhaus; J. H., who represented the Metropolitan Life Insurance
Company, married Cilley Myers and lives at Cleveland, 0.; William, who lives in Cynthian township, married Mary Eilerman; John B., who assists his father on the home farm; Regina, who is the wife of Clyde H. Peffley., a resident of Dayton; and Joseph A., who is a school-teacher, lives at home. Mr. Kloeker and his entire family are members of St. Michael's Catholic church.


J. William Klocker
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 548
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

J. WILLIAM KLOCKER
     a well-known general farmer and stockraiser of Shelby county, O., residing in section 35, Cynthian township, where he has eighty acres of fine land, was born December 23, 1872, in McLean township, and is a son of Herman and Elizabeth Klocker.
     J. William Klocker obtained his schooling in the Berlin Special School District, after which he engaged in farming, a very natural thing to do as he was reared to take an interest in this direction. In March, 3911, Mr. Klocker purchased this farm and has all but seven acres of woodland under cultivation. Through remodeling and building, draining and tiling, he has made his property much more valuable than when he bought it. He carries on mixed farming but has little grain to sell, finding it more profitable to feed stock. His markets are easy to reach, his land lying but three and one-half miles west of Newport, O., and on the Hale turnpike road through Cynthian township.
     In February, 1908, Mr. Klocker was married to Miss Mary Eilerman, a daughter of F. J. Eilerman, of McLean township, and they have two children: Leo, who was born December 23, on the Eilerman farm, 1908, in McLean township; and Margaret, who was born on the present farm October 24, 1911. Mr. Klocker and wife are members of SS- Peter and Paul Catholic church at Newport, O. He is a democrat in politics and on the democratic ticket was elected in January, 1912, a member of the board of education of the Turner Special School District.
   


L.L. Knoop
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 449
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

L. L. KNOOP
     whose well improved farm of seventy-one acres, which he purchased and improved himself, is situated six miles southeast of Sidney, O., has spent the larger part of his life in this part of Shelby county. He was born in Orange township, three-fourths of a mile north of his own farm in Green township, in August, 1871, and is a son of John and Margaret (Martin) Knoop.
     John Knoop is a highly respected retired citizen of Shelby county. He was born in Miami county, O., and at the age of seventeen years enlisted in the Civil war, and saw much hard service during the following two-years as a member of the O. Vol. Inf., including imprisonment in Libby prison. After his release he continued in the service as a teamster. When his term of enlistment was over he returned to Miami county and there engaged in farming until his marriage to Margaret Martin, when he came to Shelby county and located on the old Martin farm of forty acres. He also engaged in carpenter work and became well known all through this section. In 1909 he removed from the house he had occupied for so many years, to another house on the same farm and now lives in comfortable retirement and is the owner of 203 1-3 acres of land, which his sons operate. Mrs. Knoop passed away March 30, 1889, survived by five children, namely: Samuel, who lives one mile above Port Jefferson; L. L., who lives on his farm six miles southeast of Sidney, O.; John W., who lives east of Sidney; William, who is located on the homestead; and Mrs. Dora Leckey, who resides north of Plattsville.
     L. L. Knoop attended school in Orange township and afterward worked on the home farm until his marriage, when he came to his present property, where general farming and stock raising have been carried on ever since.  He has improved the property with modem and substantial buildings and has all his surroundings comfortable and attractive.
     Mr. Knoop was married January 11, 1894, to Miss Viola Hunt, daughter of P. R. Hunt, of Green township, near Plattsville, and they have two children : Bertha May and Harley Thomas. Mr. Knoop has served two terms as a trustee of Green township, elected on the Republican ticket, and is recognized as one of the solid and reliable citizens of this community. He is serving as a member of the county fair board and takes a hearty interest in every public movement to advance the interests of this section. Fraternally, Mr. Knoop is a Mason, a Knight of the Golden Eagles and an Odd Fellow, in the last named organization belonging to both the Encampment and the subordinate branch.


Samuel M. Knoop
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 745
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

SAMUEL M. KNOOP
     who is one of the trustees of Salem township, conducts a butcher shop at Port Jefferson, O., and also gives attention to his valuable farm of 120 acres, situated in Salem township. He was born in Orange township, Shelby county, O., April 21, 1869, and is a son of John and Margaret (Martin) Knoop. John Knoop, who still resides on his farm in Orange township, was born in Miami county, O., and is a well known and respected citizen. He was married first to Margaret Martin, who is deceased. She was the mother of the following children: Samuel M., Lee, John, William, and Dora, wife of George Leckey. Mr. Knoop's second marriage was with Celia Burton.
     Samuel M. Knoop obtained his education in the public schools and from youth has been interested in farm pursuits. He carries on a general farming line on his property in Salem township, deals to some extent in stock, also bales hay and for the past two years has additionally been engaged in the meat business at Port Jefferson. Not only is he a man of business activity and ability, but lie is also one who has been recognized as trustworthy by his fellow citizens and as a member of the township board of trustees carries business methods into public matters to the advantage of all concerned.
     In November, 1891, Mr. Knoop was married to Miss Laura Fergus, who was born in Shelby county and is a daughter of Joseph Fergus. Mr. and Mrs. Knoop have eight children, namely: Ralph, Clifford, Grace, Arvesta, Lloyd, Mary, Edna and John Joseph. The family attends the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically he is a republican and fraternally is an Odd Fellow, attending the lodge of this order at Port Jefferson.



John C. Koenig
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 649
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JOHN C. KOENIG
     whose business interests are largely centered at Botkins, O., where he is in the hardware line, being the senior member of the firm of Koenig Bros., proprietors of the Botkins Hardware Company, was born on a farm in Auglaize county, O., one and one-half miles north of Botkins, September 19, 1880. His parents are John H. and Margaret Koenig, who are well-known and highly esteemed residents of Botkins.
     John C. Koenig was reared on the home farm and attended the country schools. His first business experience away from home was as a traveling salesman for the International Harvester Company, of Fort Wayne, with which corporation he continued for two years, when he came to Botkins to make a permanent business establishment, in which commendable undertaking he was associated with his brother, Michael Koenig, and they, under the firm style of Koenig Bros., bought the hardware business then conducted by Jacob Paul. For the past seven years they have operated their present store, enlarging their stock as demand has arisen and probably have one of the largest and best equipped stores in the general hardware line, in this part of Shelby county. John C. Koenig is a member of the Catholic church
and is identified with the Knights of Columbus at Sidney. Mr. Koenig is unmarried.



Henry Kuether
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 826
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

HENRY KUETHER
     proprietor of the Sidney Dairy, at Sidney,O., one of the large and successful business enterprises of Shelby county, owns 120 acres of fine land in Clinton township and eighty acres in Turtle Creek township and keeps about fifty head of Shorthorn and Polled Durham cattle. He was born in Auglaize county, O., January 6, 1861, and is a son of Henry and Angeline (Shumacher) Kuether.
     The parents of Mr. Kuether were born in Germany and came to America when young and were married in Ohio. They were farming people in Auglaize county and were devout members of the Catholic church. Of their children, Henry was the first bom, the others being: Caroline, who is the wife of William Kovermann; Catherine, who is the wife of Charles Broermann; Rosa, who is the wife of John Suter; John; Anthony; and Josephine, who is the wife of Henry Voskuhl.
     When he was thirteen years of age, Henry Kuether left school and began work for his father on the home farm and remained there until he was thirty years old and then came to Shelby county. His first purchase of land was a tract of eighty acres, to which he added another eighty, afterward forty acres. In addition to carrying on general farming and raising stock for his own use, Mr. Kuether operates his large dairy, as before mentioned, making a daily shipment of fifty gallons of milk to Sidney, where he disposes of it wholesale. He is one of the enterprising business men of this section, paying careful attention to his own affairs and prospering accordingly.
     In February, 1891, Mr. Kuether was married to Miss Mary Winover, who was born in Mercer county, O., a daughter of Henry and Anna (Hubert) Winover, who were farming people in Mercer and Henry counties. They had seven children; Mary, Martin, Geard, John, Anna, Elizabeth and Rosa. To Mr. and Mrs. Kuether three children have been born: Henry, Rosa and Anna. The family belongs to the Catholic church at Sidney. In politics Mr. Kuether is a democrat.


Martin Lacey
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 821
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

MARTIN LACEY
     who has been a resident of Sidney, Ohio, since 1866, now lives retired in his very comfortable residence at No. 431 South Ohio avenue, was born November 11, 1830, at Knockscamolin, County Wexford, Ireland, and is a son of James and Mary Lacey.
     Martin Lacey was seven years old when brought to the United States and he attended the public schools at Cincinnati, Ohio. He afterward learned the machinist trade, his instructor being Morris Greenwood, an early manufacturer there of fire engines. Mr. Lacey continued to work at his trade in Cincinnati for fifteen years, when he came to Sidney, where he went to work in a sawmill and became a manufacturer of chairs, later established a small factory and conducted this business for about seven years. Mr. Lacey then began to do some building and erected about twelve houses at Sidney, they being on his own property and he still owns and rents them, they occupying the old site of his sawmill. He also was in the grocery trade for about twenty years, retiring from the same in 1900. Mr. Lacey is a well known and highly respected citizen and during his long business career was noted for his sterling honesty.
     At Sidney, April 17, 1869, Mr. Lacey was married to Miss Annie Harrison, who was born in this city, a daughter of John Harrison, who left Ohio in her infancy and in 1849 started for California and died on the plains while on the way. Mrs. Lacey was adopted by a childless resident of Sidney and this city has always been her home. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Lacey: Mayme; Bertha, who is the wife of John McNeff, of Lima, and they have one child, Mary Margaret; Dorothy, who died in 1898, when aged twenty-two years; and Jessie, who died in 1890, when aged eleven years. Mr. Lacey has never been very active in politics, although always a good and mindful citizen in a quiet way, and has usually cast his vote with the Republican party.


J.P. Lallemand
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 633
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

J. P. LALLEMAND
     who is treasurer of the Grisez special school district in Cynthian township, and formerly president of its board of education, resides on his excellent farm of eighty acres, situated in section 23, two and one-half miles northwest of Newport, O. He was born in Darke county, O., April 27, 1866, and is a son of Peter Lallemand and his wife Mary (Poiret) Lallemand.
     The parents of Mr. Lallemand were born in France. The father came to the United States when aged twenty-five years and after marriage settled in Darke county, O., where three sons and one daughter were born. The mother died at the age of thirty-nine years and the one daughter is also deceased. The father lives retired at Newport, O., having moved to Shelby county with his family about 1867.
     J. P. Lallemand was about one year old when his parents came to this county and he attended school in the Turner district and assisted his father to clear and cultivate the farm be now occupies. He has lived here for twenty-three years and has devoted himself to farming and stock raising, having all his land under tillage with the exception of fourteen acres in valuable timber.
     Mr. Lallemand married Miss Elizabeth Meyer, a daughter of Henry Meyer and they have had the following children : Lawrence, Beatrice, Mary, Marion and Margaret, twins, Margaret (2) and Francis. The first Margaret died in infancy. Mr. Lallemand and family are members of SS. Peter and Paul Roman Catholic church at Newport, O. In politics he is a democrat. He served for two years as president of the board of education and since January, 1912, has been treasurer of this body, as mentioned above. He is a highly respected and trustworthy citizen.


James Anderson Lamb
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 522
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JAMES ANDERSON LAMB
     formerly one of the foremost business men of Sidney and at the time of death, December 9, 1898, president of the Citizens National Bank, was closely identified with this section of country for more than a half century. He was born in Pennsylvania, December 14, 1815, a son of Samuel and Jane (Anderson) Lamb.
     During youth James A. Lamb worked on a farm, attended the subscription schools and until 1833 was a clerk in a store. In 1834 he came to Ohio and with a partner went into the drug business first at Mansfield and later at Lancaster. He was a man of great business perception and his whole subsequent life showed the shrewd foresight that provides for emergencies while it also ventures into unknown fields. In January, 1840, he embarked in the mercantile business with Colonel Zinn and in the spring of 1842 came to Sidney, which was then a village but the business field seemed promising, and the partners started here a factory for the manufacture of pearlash, the product being conveyed overland to Sandusky. Mr. Lamb continued with Colonel Zinn until 1868 and then sold his interest and purchased a farm. This land he sold two years afterward in order to accept the presidency of the Citizens National Bank, one that he held until his death. For eight years Mr. Lamb was a member of the city council and introduced the ordinance providing for waterworks and was largely instrumental in carrying this and other public-spirited projects to a successful issue. He had much to do with the material growth of Sidney, building the warehouse later occupied by Moore & Marshall, his own fine residence, the handsome Presbyterian church and parsonage and many other structures. He was the second son born in his parents' family, all of whom came to Ohio; John, Hannah, James Anderson, Samuel, Margaret, Jane and Elenor, Hannah becoming the wife of Colonel Zinn, Jane becoming the wife of Silas Thompson, and Elenor, the wife of Henry Wilkinson.
     In 1843 Mr. Lamb was married to Miss Julia A. Taylor, who was born in Shelby county, a daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Stipp) Taylor, farming people. The father of Mrs. Lamb was born in Maryland and the mother in Virginia. They were members of the Christian church. Mrs. Lamb was their youngest child, the others being: Jason,
George and William; Susan, wife of Abner Girard; Margaret, wife of Mark Broderick; and Lewis and Shelby. Mr. Lamb was reared in the Presbyterian church and to that religious body he gave liberally. For many years he was identified with the Masonic fraternity.


William Watt Laughlin
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 833
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

WILLIAM WATT LAUGHLIN
     who is a well-known resident of Turtle Creek township and one of the three heirs to a valuable farm of 160 acres, was born in Logan county, O., in 1871, and is a son of John M. and Jennie (Leapley) Laughlin. The father was a farmer and also a carpenter. The mother still resides on the old home farm but the father died on May 5, 1911. The family consisted of but two sons: William Watt and Arthur, the latter of whom lives in Washington township.
     William Watt Laughlin had excellent educational advantages, after completing the common school course going to the Northern Ohio University at Ada and remaining a student there for several terms. He then returned to the home farm, on which the family has lived since he was seven years old, and practically assumed charge, relieving his father and since the latter's death has managed all the industries for himself, mother and brother. He raises an excellent grade of stock but not more than is needed for home use, and devotes his land to general farming.
     In politics Mr. Laughlin is a democrat and exerts considerable influence in local affairs. He served two terms as township assessor and is serving in his second term as township trustee. Mr. Laughlin is known as an honest, intelligent and upright man and good citizen. With his mother he attends the Methodist Episcopal church. His only fraternal connection is with the Knights of the Golden Eagle.


Jacob R. Leapley
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 539
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JACOB R. LEAPLEY
     who, in addition to being a stockholder in the Farmers Telephone Company, owns 120 acres of some of the finest land in Franklin township, Shelby county, O., was born in this county September 15, 1864, and is a son of Othol and Mary (Stone) Leapley.
     Othol Leapley and wife belonged to old pioneer families of Shelby county, where they were born, married, and passed out of life. They were estimable people and liberal supporters of the Methodist Episcopal church, attending at Port Jefferson, and their burial was in the cemetery there. Their family consisted of five children, three sons, namely: Quin, Charles and Jacob Raper; and two daughters, Anna, wife of Newton Wooley, and Blanche, wife of, Orrin C. Staley.
     Jacob R. Leapley attended the country schools with his brothers and sisters and afterward, as a dutiful son, assisted his father until he was twenty-one years old. About this time occurred his marriage and he then went to Nebraska where he rented land and raised one crop. Conditions there, however, did not look promising to a young man when compared to those he had left behind in Shelby county, therefore he returned and for two years following rented farm land in Franklin township. He then moved on the place which he now owns, a part of the old Yinger farm, which he rented for twelve years previous to buying. He is one of the township's most prosperous stockmen as well as farmer, paying particular attention to Jersey cattle, Shropshire sheep, Percheron horses and O. I. C. hogs.
     On December 17, 1885, Mr. Leapley was married to Miss Lollie Fee, who was born in Shelby county, a daughter of William and Sarah (McClure) Fee, both of whom were also born in this county. The father of Mrs. Leapley is deceased, but the mother still resides here. Mrs. Leapley has one older sister, Maggie, who is the wife of James Shaw; and a brother, Frank, and a sister, Mattie, who is the wife of William Davis, both younger. Mr. and Mrs. Leapley have but one son, Rollie, who remains with his parents. Mr. Leapley and family are active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is a trustee, treasurer and steward. In politics be is a republican.


Earl Lee
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 854
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

EARL LEE
     a leading citizen of Shelby county, O., now serving in his third term as a member of the city council of Sidney, representing the Third ward, has important business interests as well, being extensively engaged in the real estate business and the sole owner of the Earl Lee Company, wholesale and retail liquor dealers and compounders of medicines. Mr. Lee was born at Wiley Station, Darke county, O., January 4, 1879, and is a son of Thomas and Emma Lee. The father of Mr. Lee was engaged in the timber business prior to 1891, when he retired to Sidney, and is now deceased.
     Earl Lee accompanied his parents to different points in Ohio as best suited his father's business affairs, and when the family settled permanently at Sidney he entered the public schools here.  In 1898 he embarked in the liquor business at Wapakoneta, O., where he continued until 1901, when he sold out and returned to Sidney and took charge of what is now the Earl Lee Company, the business having been founded by his brother, Val Lee, in 1891, who is now chief deputy state fire marshal. The medicines compounded by the above company .are all prepared according to the pure drug act and bear the U. S. government tax stamp, the remedies being known as the Leecuru medicines and they have a wide sale and are considered specifics for many diseases. In handling real estate, Mr. Lee makes auction and private lot sales a specialty and offers reliable realty, home owning and business investment propositions. His value to his fellow citizens, as a member of the council, to which he was elected on the democratic ticket, is very generally recognized on account of his intense public spirit, and the business acumen which is needful in public matters as well as personal enterprises.
     Mr. Lee was married to Miss Flora Heil, who is a daughter of Henry and Minnie Heil, and they have two children: Forest and Esther. In 1911 Mr. Lee erected his handsome modem residence on South Main avenue, Sidney.


Jacob M. LeFevre
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 744
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JACOB M. LE FEVRE
     a highly respected retired fanner living at Port Jefferson, O., where he has a comfortable residence, owns also a fine farm of eighty acres situated in Salem township, Shelby county, O., and on that farm he was born, May 31, 1843. His parents were Henry Jackson and Elenore (Morgan) Le Fevre.
     Henry Jackson Le Fevre was born in Warren county, O., and after marriage moved to Salem township, Shelby county, where he engaged in farming until his death, in 1848. After his decease his widow married Thomas Stewart. To her first marriage four children were born: Mary Jane, Morgan, Jacob M. and Henry J. To her second marriage three children were born: John M., Millard F. and Ansel M.
     Jacob M. Le Fevre attended the district school when he could be spared from farm work. He was five years old when his father died and when yet a boy worked for two years on a farm in Warren county. When the civil war broke out his step-father, a half brother; and two full brothers enlisted and Jacob M. then came back to the homestead and remained helping his mother until the close of the war and after her death purchased the property. He is a self made man, few advantages having been afforded him in youth, but in making his own way in the world he has found many friends and has won the confidence and approval of those with whom he has had business relations. Mr. Le Fevre was twice elected a trustee of Salem township, on the republican ticket, and also served usefully and efficiently as township supervisor and on the school board.
     On December 20, 1866, Mr. Le Fevre was married to Miss Dulcinna Line, a daughter of Solomon Line of Perry township, the other members of the family being: Florence M., Ella, Alice, Nancy, Esther and O. T.  To Mr. and Mrs. Le Fevre the following children have been born: Edwin Justin, William O., James T., Jennie, Alice, wife of Allen Baker, Minnie, wife of Lafe Vesper, Guernie, wife of Elza Baker, and Cora, wife of Sanford Retter. Mr. Le Fevre and family attend the Disciples church. He belongs to the Odd Fellows and attends lodge at Port Jefferson.


General Benjamin LeFevre
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 653
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

GENERAL BENJAMIN LeFEVRE
     the subject of this somewhat extended biographical sketch, is a thorough Buckeye, having been born on a farm in Salem township, ten miles northeast of Sidney, October 8, 1838. His parents were pioneers and the ancestral acres of great fertility Ben has owned for years and has recently erected a spacious farm house, approached by a drive shaded with an arcade of maples.
     From the ample porch of this delightful rustic abode he can sniff the aroma of the apple blossoms of his nearby orchard and the fragrance of its ripening fruit.
     Higher criticism, with its convenient elasticity, had not been developed rendering it possible to interpret the plain injunction of Scripture to multiply and replenish the earth to mean race suicide, so the God-fearing LeFevre household was filled with a large family of stalwart boys and girls, with appetites commensurate with their healthy out-of-door activities and digestion that an ostrich might covet, thus furnishing a home market for the surplus products of the farm.
     Though he was not born with a gold spoon in his mouth, as that article was not plenty in those pioneer days of nearly a century ago, he never felt the grip of poverty for the home domain was ample. As the virgin land furnished employment in all seasons, Satan, who gets in his work where there are idle hands, steered clear of that busy, industrious household.
     Ben's pockets were not distended with an annoying surplus of pin money, as filthy lucre was not a profuse commodity in those days, and did not admit of liberal distribution to such an extent as to invite burglarious invasion, but the larder was never, empty and its products were dispensed freely in those hospitable times.
     He was by nature optimistic, kept himself on the silver lining side of life clouds and shadows, was full of hope and as his sky was thickly set with lofty ideals he bent every energy to achieve and realize their fruition; and his life attest how successful he has been. In his lexicon there was no such word as "fail."
     What crude privileges the log country schoolhouses afforded he embraced, but the three R's were the extent of the curriculum, and to the rule of three was the limit of the pedagogic ability to instruct.
     In due time he was sent to Sidney for advanced instruction, attended several terms and subsequently taught school and became a student at the Miami University at Oxford.
     An episode in his pedagogical career illustrates his natural tact and diplomacy which has served him so well in untying hard knots and straightening tangles. He had one very refractory pupil who gave him a world of trouble, and, feeling that forbearance had ceased to be a virtue, he kept the miscreant in the schoolhouse one evening for substantial settlement. When about ready to administer, a deserved castigation; Ben looked out of a window and caught a glimpse of the irate mother, who was a terror in skirts, sidling up to the schoolhouse with a stride that meant business.  She paused a while to listen to the interior proceedings. Not relishing the red hot fury of a woman, Ben at once changed his tactics and in a voice that could be distinctly heard outside, said: "Jim, I wish you would suppress your animal spirits and mischievous ways, for you have marked ability and noble qualities. I did not keep you in for punishment but to have a good talk and appeal to your better nature. You are the hope of your kind and indulgent mother who would do anything for your welfare and solicitous as she is through the day for you I have no doubt that she remembers you in her prayers each
night, and I am doing my best to help her make of you an honor to her and a useful man. At this the mother burst in the door, totally disarmed, and poured the contents of her vial of wrath, intended for Ben, upon her son. This diplomatic stroke endeared Ben to her not only the rest of the term but ever afterward.
     When the slogan of the Civil war sounded Ben's quick and patriotic ear heard it, and he joined the Benton cadets, went to Missouri, and served in General Fremont's brief campaign, going as far as Springfield in that state. When the cadets were mustered out he came home as lieutenant and when the Ninety-ninth Ohio regiment was organized joined at Lima, serving as major in the army until the final surrender of the rebel host. He returned to Sidney, studied law with Smith and Cummins, leading attorneys of Sidney, and was admitted to the bar, but having a stronger taste for politics than of legal practice he was elected to the state legislature from Shelby county.
     At the close of his term he was appointed governor of the territory of Washington by President Johnson, but which was changed to a consulship to Nurenburg, Bavaria. At that time Andrew G. Curtis, Pennsylvania war governor, was minister to Russia, and Elihu Washburn, minister to France, and the three became fast friends.
     Upon his return to this country he was employed by Col. Thomas A. Scott to look after the revenue cases of the Pennsylvania railway and remained until he resigned to run for democratic congressional nomination from this district, composed of Shelby, Miami, Darke, Mercer and Auglaize counties. A mass convention was held in Sidney, and after a fierce fight of three days and nights, the time Jonah spent in making interior observations of the whale, Ben was victorious by one and a half votes on the two hundred and eighteenth ballot for the forty-sixth congress, and triumphantly elected in November.
     While serving his first term the district was changed to comprise Shelby, Auglaize, Alien, Mercer, Paulding, Putnam, Defiance and Van Wert counties. Five of these counties were represented by W. D. Hill, who was up for renomination, but Ben won on the first ballot. The district was again changed and Ben served continuously for eight years. It is safe to say that no representative ever served his constituents with more fidelity than General LeFevre, or procured more lucrative employment for democratic hoys in republican administrations than he. His diplomacy and suavity did the work. Milton E. Ailes, who subsequently became assistant secretary of the treasury under Lyman D. Gage, was one of his boys from Sidney.
     Upon entering congress he served on the committee on agriculture and the committee on military affairs, and introduced the first bill for the suppression of contagious diseases among domestic animals. He introduced the resolution creating the department of agriculture and always espoused the cause of the soldiers, and was ever at his post.
     At the close of his congressional career he was engaged by the Erie railway to look after claims, and for twenty-three years was in its service, resigning in the summer of 1909, much to the regret of the railroad managers, as letters show.
     Many of these years his vacations were spent in Europe, and he has crossed the Atlantic over twenty times and visited all the countries of the continent and nearly all the cities, and sipped the waters of its famous springs. Being a great pedestrian, he mingled much with the peasants and common people studying their habits and modes of life, and has made footprints, man's size, in the soil from Italy to Finland, not giving Sweden and Norway the go-by. His views afoot if written out would fill volumes.
     After Mr. LeFevre's resignation as a railway official, he again set sail for Europe, and pausing long enough to get breath, started on an overland trip to the Orient. It was more of a leisurely saunter than trip, as he took his own time and avoided the water as much as possible. He left France, traversed Austria and Hungary and the Balkan states to Constantinople, where he spent two weeks. A religious festival was in progress and the supply of Moslem prayers seemed to be largely in excess of the demand. He next went to Smyrna and to Jerusalem, where he stayed three weeks, visiting all the places of interest and some not so interesting. It seemed as if all the beggars were expecting him, from the welcome they gave him, and had an idea that he had a souvenir for each one. Ben donkeyed and cameled it across Arabia and sailed across the Arabian sea to Bombay, India, a most wonderful city, with the finest architecture in the world. The hotel Taj Mahal is not excelled for artistic beauty by any on earth, and is owned by a parsee. He made the acquaintance of several parsees, who are the merchants of the city. He journeyed to Delhi and at Agra saw the famous tomb Taj Mahal, built for an Indian princess at a cost of $20,000,000. When Lord Curzon was viceroy of India he had a lamp that had been destroyed or taken from the tomb replaced, but could find only two men that could do it. One of these was brought from Persia, and they were about two years in fashioning it. He passed through Lucknow and Cawnpore on his way to the sacred city of Benares, on the Ganges, where he paused for several days. From thence he went to Calcutta, at the delta of the Ganges on the Bay of Bengal. It is the most interesting city that be saw so far on his journey, and its jute mills are the largest in the world; employing 57,000 men. The experts in these mills get twelve cents a day and the others less. They live on rice the year around, a most monotonous diet, and it goes without saying that they do not buy it in Sidney nor Dayton. From there he sailed diagonally across the Bay of Bengal, rounded the peninsula of Malacca, passed Singapore on his way to Borneo, Hong Kong and Canton, a most interesting city, where half a million people live on boats, briefly viewed the Philippines on his way to Japan, where be remained for some time, then took a Pacific steamer for San Francisco, halting for awhile at the beautiful flower-embowered city of Honolulu. From San Francisco he went to Southern California and returned by way of Texas to Sidney, where he was most warmly greeted by his many friends after a year's absence. Abstemious in his habits, careful in diet, drinking Vichy water as a beverage, the year was one of unbroken health and enjoyment.  How one so genial and a social favorite has managed to elude Cupid's darts seems strange, but he has, and is as ever in "maiden meditation and fancy free," with no obvious symptoms of change for "better or for worse."
                                              A. B. C. HITCHCOCK.


Ord Otterbein Lemaster, M.D.
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 857
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

ORD OTTERBEIN LEMASTER, M.D.
     who is engaged in medical practice in Kettlersville, Van Buren township, is a son of Luman W. and Mary (Chew) LeMaster, the father a native of Shelby county, Ohio. His parents' family consisted of ten children; Beulah S., Luman C., William C., Mary E., Bertha T., Edith M., Una Maude, Arthur, Vernon W., and Ord O., whose record in brief is as follows: Beulah S. married Lynn L. Rockwell and resides in Jay county, Indiana. Luman C. married Belle Wherley and they also reside in Jay county, Ind. William C. married Lotta E. Lewis and their home is at Montrose, Colo. Mary Elsie is the wife of Mathias J. Atkinson of Jay county, Ind. Bertha married John F. Yeager, principal of schools at Brazil, Ind., where they reside. Una Maude is the wife of Dr. G. W. Phillips and lives in David City, Nebraska. Edith M. married Henry Meinholtz and they reside in Okmulgee, Okla. Arthur R. married Maude McGlaughlin and their home is in Jay county, Ind. Vernon is attending school at Ann Arbor, Mich.
    Ord O. LeMaster acquired his literary education in the public schools of Jay county, Ind., and the Portland Normal school, subsequently pursuing his medical studies at Starling Medical College, Columbus, Ohio. After his graduation he located in Kettlersville, this county, where he has since built up a very good practice. He owns some valuable property, including his own fine residence and makes use of an automobile in visiting his patients. Dr. LeMaster married Emma W. G. Gormhausen, a daughter of John and Mary (Strausburgh) Gormhausen, whose children, in addition to Mrs. LeMaster, were Florence, John, Edward, Charles, Anna, Benjamin, Ida, Otto, and Laura. Of the above mentioned Florence, John, Edward, and Otto are now deceased, Florence dying in 1912. Mrs. LeMaster is a member of St. Peter's Lutheran church. The Doctor is a Republican in politics. He keeps in touch with the latest discoveries in medical and surgical science, and as a citizen is ever ready to support any practical measures for the moral or material betterment of the community. He has advanced as far as the Chapter in the Masonic order.


John Lengerich
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 837
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JOHN LENGERICH
     general farmer and representative citizen of Cynthian township, Shelby county, O., where he owns fifty-four acres of fine land, lying in section 19, three miles south of Fort Loramie, was born near Minster, in Auglaize county, O., September 6, 1867, and remained in his native county until he was twelve years old.
     Prior to coming to Fort Loramie in 1879, Mr. Lengerich had attended school at Minster and 'afterward completed his education under the teaching of L. Notis and thus secured a very fair knowledge of books. He then worked as a farm hand for C. B. Danbrison & Son seven years, and afterward was engaged in farm work for seventeen years in Mercer, Darke and Shelby counties, and came to his present place in 1910. Here he has expended considerable money, in making excellent improvements, including the draining and tiling of his land and thereby has probably almost doubled its original value. He carries on general fanning and raises stock for his own use.
     Mr. Lengerich was married at Cincinnati, O., to Miss Frances Brockamp, who was born in Shelby county, O., a daughter of Bernard Brockamp, and the following children have been born to them; Bernard, George, Catherine, Lorena, Laurence, Clara, John, Marie, Louis and Edward, the last two named being deceased. Mr. Lengerich and family are members of SS. Peter and Paul Catholic church at Wynant, O. In national matters Mr. Lengerich votes with the democratic party but in local affairs he is independent. He is an interested citizen in all that concerns the welfare of his section and since January, 1912, has been a member of the board of education of the Basinburg special school district.


Frank Lindhaus
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 547
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

FRANK LINDHAUS
     a successful general farmer residing in section 19, Cynthian township, where he owns seventy-three acres of productive and well-cared-for land, was born in Ohio, November 30, 1877, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth Lindhaus.
     Frank Lindhaus was three years old when his parents moved to Fort Loramie and he obtained his education in the Berlin Special School District. General farming has occupied the time and attention of Mr. Lindhaus ever since and he has resided on this property, which lies one and one-fourth miles north of Newport, O., ever since his marriage. Here he has put in many improvements and these include the erection of the substantial buildings and the neat fencing which encloses his fields.
     In May, 1003, Mr. Lindhaus was married to Miss Elizabeth Kloecker, who is a daughter of Herman Kloecker, of McLean township, Shelby county, and they have four attractive and intelligent children: Emma, Henry, Raymond and Laurence. Mr. and Mrs. Lindhaus are members of SS. Peter and Paul Catholic church at Newport, O. In politics he has always been a democratic voter and has never accepted any public office except that of school director, and in January, 1912, was elected a member of the board of education of the Basinburg Special School District.


Ernest Lininger
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 510
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

ERNEST LININGER
     one of Sidney's well known business men, being the junior member of the firm of Fretz & Lininger, funeral directors and furniture dealers, is experienced in this line and has been established since 1910 at Sidney. He was born on a farm in Marion township, Pickaway county, O., November 18, 1882, and is a son of Michael and Adeline Lininger, who are highly respected retired residents of New Holland, O.
     Ernest Lininger was reared in his native section and attended the Marion township schools. He assisted his father on the home farm prior to entering into the undertaking business, for which he prepared by attending Clarke's School of Embalming, at Cincinnati, where he was graduated. He then entered the undertaking and furniture business at New Holland, and remained there until August, 1910, when he came to Sidney and bought a one-half interest in the undertaking business of W. E. Fretz and shortly after the partnership was formed the firm added the furniture department which has been gradually expanded until they have one of the largest furniture displays in Shelby county. They are well equipped as undertakers and funeral directors and their services are called for from different parts of the county.
      Mr. Lininger married Miss Florence West, also of Pickaway county, and they have two children: Kenneth and Virginia Alice. Mr. Lininger is a quiet, law abiding citizen, not given to much display of his sentiments but has won the respect of all with whom he has had business relations. He belongs to the fraternal order of Knights of Pythias.


John W. Lochard
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 567
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JOHN W. LOCHARD
     who now lives in comfortable retirement at Sidney, O., for many years was an extensive farmer in Salem township, where he still retains 240 acres of highly improved land, a fine farm that lies six and one-half miles northeast of Sidney. He was born in Champaign county, O., March 18, 1855, and is a son of Thomas and Eliza (Ellis) Lochard.
     The parents of John W. Lochard were bom in Virginia and were married shortly after removing with their people to West Liberty, Logan county, O. They moved then to Champaign county where they continued to live until 1874, when they came to Shelby county and the father bought 160 acres of land in Salem township on which he died in 1879, the mother surviving until 1881. After the death of both parents, John W. Lochard bought the interests of the other heirs and subsequently added more land until, as above mentioned, he has 240 acres, all in one body. During the succeeding years Mr. Lochard replaced all the old buildings with modem ones and his residence is an unusually fine example of rural architecture with attractive surroundings. In addition to general farming Mr. Lochard gave considerable attention to raising high grade hogs and cattle. Although a busy man all his active life he never neglected any duty of citizenship, arid his neighbors frequently showed their confidence in him by electing him to local offices and for seven years he served as a trustee of Salem. township. In 1905 he was elected a county commissioner on the democratic ticket and continued in this responsible office until 1911, in the spring of which year he came to Sidney.
     Mr. Lochard married Miss Clara Belle Murphy, a daughter of H. C. and Nancy Murphy, farming people of Franklin township. Shelby county, and four children have been born to them, namely: Laura Celia, who is the wife of George L. Kraft, and they have one daughter, Virginia; Mabel Clare, who is the wife of Dr. Fred McVay, of Botkins, O.; the third daughter, who died at the age of eleven years, and Hazel Ellen, who lives at home. Mr. Lochard and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is identified with several fraternal bodies that have a large and representative membership in this section, including the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of Khorassan.


Wallace A. Lochard
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 793
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

WALLACE A. LOCHARD
     one of the industrious and successful young agriculturists of Salem township, Shelby county, O., who operates the Walnut Grove Farm belonging to his father, a valuable tract of 160 acres, was born in Salem township, February 1, 1886, and is a son of Isaac A. and Alma (Fox) Lochard.
     The parents of Mr. Lochard are well known people of Shelby county and when they removed from the farm in Salem township they retired to Sidney, where they still reside. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Sidney. Their family consisted of three children: Wallace A., Iva and Charles.
     Wallace A. Lochard was educated in the public schools and the Western University at Delaware, O., in which institution he remained one year and then returned to his father whom he assisted until he was twenty-two, years of age. Afterward, for three years, he rented and operated a farm in Perry township and then took charge of the Walnut Grove Farm, all but twelve acres of which lies in Salem township. Farming and stock raising are the industries carried on and Mr. Lochard is meeting with the success his energy and progressive methods justify him in expecting.
     On October 22, 1908, Mr. Lochard was married to Miss Grace Wooley, a daughter of William and Jennie Wooley, of Perry township. Mr. and Mrs. Lochard have one daughter, Beulah. They attend the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Lochard is a wide awake citizen and is interested in all that promises to make better conditions all over the country, but he feels that he has no time for office holding. Like his father he votes the democratic ticket.


John W. Lorton
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 628
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

JOHN W. LORTON
     who is engaged in farming and stock raising in Loramie township, owns 100 acres of productive land, situated in section 18, two miles from Russia, O. He was born in Clinton township, Shelby county, O., December 15, 1860, and is a son of George Allison and Catherine (Glasford) Lorton.
      George Allison Lorton was born in Shelby county and died at the age of sixty years, his burial being at Sidney. All his life he worked hard as a day laborer, never having had any educational opportunities in his youth, but was universally respected for his many excellent traits of character. He married Catherine Glasford, who was born in Germany and was brought to Montgomery county, Ohio, when seven years old. She now lives in Turtle Creek township. They became the parents of thirteen children, and of this large family three sons-and two daughters are living. They were members of the Lutheran church.
     John W. Lorton was reared in Clinton township and secured his schooling there, and as soon as old enough began to be self supporting, working on farms or in any way that was honorable, for six years being a railroad employe. After marriage he settled at Houston and as soon as he had accumulated enough money bought eighty-five acres in Loramie township. He later sold that property and in 1910 purchased his present farm.
     Mr. Lorton was married to Miss Louisa Wintringham, who was born at Houston, a daughter of George and Christiana (Ervin) Wintringham, both of whom died in Loramie township. Mr. and Mrs. Lorton have four children: Freeborn F., who married Ina Hoover, who died leaving a daughter, Evelyn; Blanche, who is the wife of Jesse Wilbaum, of near Anna Station, by whom she has two children, Ellen and Laurence; John E., who first married Minerva Langston, deceased, and later Tracey Stout of Noble county; and Walter, who lives at home. They are also rearing a youth named Roy Grimes. Mr. Lorton has been a lifelong republican but has never been very active in politics. He takes an interest in all local matters as becomes a good citizen and cheerfully assists in supporting the schools of Huffman special school district. The family belongs to the Christian church at Houston.


George R. Loudenbach
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 782
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

GEORGE R. LOUDENBACH
     one of the well known business men of Sidney, O., who operates a general repair shop and is a bicycle dealer, came first to Sidney in 1883, and has been a permanent resident since 1892. He was born on a farm in Champaign county, O., March 4, 1849, and is a son of Emanuel and Anna (McCoy) Loudenbach.
     Emanuel Loudenbach and wife came to Ohio from Virginia, now West Virginia, and the father engaged in farming in Champaign county, where his death occurred. His widow survived and died at Oakley, Ill., while on a visit, being then aged eighty-two years.
     George R. Loudenbach grew up on the home farm and early discovered that he possessed not only mechanical aptitude but mercantile ability, the latter being shown when he easily sold farm implements and this led him to engage in the business at Urbana, where he continued for two years. He then was engaged as a traveling salesman for the Long-Alstater Company, manufacturers of farm implements, of Hamilton, O., and traveled for that house for eleven years, his territory being northern Ohio and Illinois, and during this period his first visit was made to Sidney. When he retired from the life of a commercial traveler and desired to go into business for himself he came to Sidney, where he dealt in farm implements for twenty years, closing out that branch of his business in 1908. He keeps busily occupied repairing bicycles, automobiles, sewing machines, vulcanizing and in similar work and also sells bicycles for which there is a steady demand, this handy vehicle yet claiming many votaries of healthful exercise.
     Mr. Loudenbach was married first to Miss Ida Dickensheets, a daughter of John D. Dickensheets, March 8, 1883, who died in 1900, survived by one daughter, Margaret. At Sidney, O., Mr. Loudenbach was married (second) to Miss Mabel Snyder, in August, 1912. Politically a democrat, Mr. Loudenbach has, at times, been called upon to serve in responsible offices and for seven years was a trustee of the water works and on two occasions was elected a member of the board of public service. Fraternally he is identified with the Red Men and the Tribe of Ben Hur and belongs to both branches of Odd Fellowship. Mr. Loudenbach enjoys out door sports and is a member of the Shelby County Deer Hunters' Association.


Michael Loy
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 495
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

MICHAEL LOY
     one of the representative citizens of Shelby county, O., who resides on his valuable farm of seventy-four acres, which is situated in section 18, Cynthian township, two and one-half miles south of Fort Loramie, has been more continuously connected with educational matters in the Basinburg special school district, of which he is the present clerk, than any other resident of the township for the past thirty-six years. Mr. Loy was born September 1, 1853; in McLean township, Shelby county, and is a son of George and Catherine Loy.
     George Loy was born in Germany and was a young man when he came to the United States and settled in McLean township, locating at first among the early settlers west of Fort Loramie, whom he assisted to clear their lands. Later he bought a tract of eighty acres located south of Fort Loramie, in partnership with a Mr. Smith, the latter taking the south one-half and Mr. Loy the north one-half and this land now belongs to Michael Loy. He lost his wife, Catherine Loy, when their only child, Michael, was three years old, and his own death occurred seven years later.
     Thus, when but ten years old, Michael Loy was made an orphan. For three years afterward he lived with an uncle, when the latter's death left him again without legal protectors, and he then became a member of the family of a Mr. Wagler, a farmer in Cynthian township, with whom he lived for one year and eight months. From there he went to the home of an aunt and worked for her as a hired man, in the meanwhile attending school as regularly as he was able, in what is now the Basinburg special school district, being obliged, at that time, to go back and forth through the woods as there had been little clearing done in that locality. Mr. Loy's memory goes back to the building of the old United Brethren church edifice, which, is now in ruins, and he can easily recall the introduction of many of the most useful farm implements and machinery, now in constant use on his own land, the same never having been even thought of when he was a boy. After his marriage, Mr. Loy rented farm land until 1882, when he purchased the property on which he has lived ever since arid successfully carries on his different farm industries, assisted more or less by several of his sons.
     In 1879 Mr. Loy was married to Miss Hattie Groh, who was born in Cynthian township, Shelby county, a daughter of Ludwig Groh and wife. They were natives of Germany who lived in Pennsylvania before coming to Dayton, O., and later to Shelby county. The father of Mrs. Loy died in Cynthian township and the mother in Auglaize county, O. To Mr. and Mrs. Loy the following children were born; Harvey W., who is president of a university in Union county, Ky.; Rosa, who is the wife of Ross Hotchkiss and they live in Illinois; Frances, who is a high appreciated teacher in the Basinburg special school district; Albert, who resides east of Sidney, married Viola Mills; Frank, who teaches school in Perry township, married Elsie Geer and is a student of theology; George; Walter, who is a student at Ada, O.; Elmer; and Emma and Nettie who are in school. Mr. Loy is a republican in his political sentiments and has frequently been elected to township offices, serving at times on the election board and as judge of election, and in 1876 was first appointed a member of the special school board, on which he has served ever since with the exception of six years. He and wife belong to the United Brethren church, while the children are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.


Marcellus N. Lucas
"History of Shelby County, Ohio"
by A.B.C. Hitchcock; Sidney, Ohio; 1913
Richmond-Arnold Pub. Co.; Chicago, IL.
Page 705
Submitted by: Diana (Souders) Smith,

MARCELLUS N. LUCAS
     a representative citizen of Perry township, Shelby county, O., a member of the township board of trustees and the owner of seventy acres of fine farming land here, was born April 12, 1867, one and one-half miles northeast of this farm, and is a son of Patrick Good and Thurza (De Weese) Lucas.
     Patrick Good Lucas was a well known farmer in Perry township and was a son of one of the early settlers of Shelby county. He was identified with the republican party but merely as a citizen, never desiring to hold office. His wife was also born in Shelby county and she survives, her husband, passing away on June 25, 1906, his burial being at Port Jefferson. They had two children: Ethel, who is the wife of Calvin Boyer and they reside with her mother on the home farm; and Marcellus N.
     Marcellus N. Lucas secured a public school education and worked on the home farm until his marriage, after which he went to Logan county and remained ten months. After returning to Shelby county he rented land for ten years, then bought a farm and later sold it and in 1903 purchased his present farm from Dr. Milholland. A general line of farming is successfully carried on and enough good stock for home use is raised, no effort being made to do more in this direction.
     On January 1, 1890, Mr. Lucas was married to Miss Sarah Nichols, a daughter of William and Catherine (Criffield) Nichols, substantial farming people of Shelby county. Mrs. Lucas had the following brothers and sisters: John, Frank and William, and Belle, who is now deceased, was the wife of David Speece, Mr. and Mrs. Lucas have four children: Norma B., Grace A., Vesta and Doris. The entire family belongs to the Baptist church. In politics Mr. Lucas has always cast his vote with the Republican party.


 
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